Patterns and Determinants of Immigrants’ Sense of Belonging to Canada and Their Source Country

Source: 
Statistics Canada

This study assesses immigrants’ acculturation profiles as measured by their sense of belonging to Canada and their source country by looking at possible acculturation outcomes and determinants as well as data from the Statistics Canada’s 2013 General Social Survey.

More Information: 

This study assesses immigrants’ acculturation profiles as measured by their sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It first examines the relative distribution of immigrants who have a strong sense of belonging to both Canada and their source country; a strong sense of belonging to Canada only; a strong sense of belonging to their source country only; and a weak sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It further examines four sets of determinants of these acculturation profiles, including source-country socioeconomic and cultural characteristics, immigration entry status, post-migration experience, and demographic characteristics. Using a large nationally representative sample of 7,003 immigrants in Canada from over 100 countries, this study finds that the overwhelming majority of immigrants have a strong sense of belonging to Canada with or without a strong sense of belonging to their source country. Source-country attributes are as important as immigration entry status and post-migration experience in affecting immigrants’ sense of belonging to Canada and their source country.