Resources

Latest resources in the settlement sector of Ontario.

Here we post new resources and more.

Creating Positive Spaces for LGBTQIA+ Newcomers Level 2

The course is intended for managers and service providers to more effectively serve LGBTQIA+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual) immigrants, refugees, and newcomers. This three (3) week training is supplementary to Creating Positive Spaces for LGBTQIA+ Newcomers Level 1. It provides tactical & practical tools to address LGBTQIA+ newcomer issues and reviews organizational change strategies.

Training for Employment Support Services (TESS)

This FREE course is designed to provide settlement service providers with the knowledge, skills, and tools to understand and address the needs, challenges and opportunities for clients seeking employment. Ultimately, the goal of this course is to prepare learners to provide excellent employment-related services, support, referrals and advocacy to immigrants, refugees and all/any migrants, by understanding the big issues that impact migrant communities in the areas of employment, developing a critical analysis, and learning about promising innovative practices.

The Wealth of Immigrant Families in Canada

This study documents the evolution of the wealth of immigrant families and of their Canadian-born counterparts from 1999 to 2016. The study uses data from Statistics Canada’s Survey of Financial Security. The study finds that increases in housing equity and in the value of registered pension plan (RPP) assets were the main drivers of wealth growth from 1999 to 2016. However, the relative importance of increases in housing equity was greater for immigrant families than for Canadian-born families. This reflects the fact that compared with Canadian-born families, immigrant families generally hold a greater share of their wealth in housing but a smaller share in RPP assets. While the increases in home prices observed since the late 1990s drove much of the growth in housing equity, the lower rates of return on financial assets observed after 1999 were a key factor underlying the growth in the net present value of RPP assets.

Labour Market Outcomes Among Refugees to Canada

Canada welcomed over 830,000 refugees from the 1980s to 2000s. However, their economic outcomes, especially the variation among major refugee groups, have not been examined comprehensively. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database, this paper examines the labour market outcomes of refugees from 13 source countries with large inflows to Canada over the 1980-to-2009 period. The analysis first compares employment rates and earnings among refugees from the 13 source countries. It further compares each refugee group with economic-class and family-class immigrants who arrived during the same period. The results reveal a very large variation in employment rates and average earnings among the 13 refugee groups. Groups with low employment rates tended to have low earnings levels among the employed. Groups with low (high) employment rates and earnings among the men also tended to have low (high) rates among the women. Very little of the variation in earnings among refugee groups could be accounted for by differences in observable human capital characteristics, economic conditions or the program of entry to Canada. Privately sponsored refugees earned more than comparable government assisted refugees during the initial years in Canada. However, this advantage disappeared after a decade in the country.

The Financing of Immigrant-owned Firms in Canada

Using data from the 2011 and 2014 Survey on Financing and Growth of Small and Medium Enterprises, this paper examines access to financing by immigrant business owners. It documents the main financing sources of immigrant‑owned and Canadian‑owned small and medium‑sized enterprises (SMEs). The results suggest that financing sources tend to be similar for the two groups, although immigrant owners tend to turn to formal financial institutions less often than their Canadian‑born counterparts. The paper further explores whether immigrant‑owned SMEs have greater difficulty accessing financial capital than SMEs with Canadian‑born owners. Immigrant owners are less likely than Canadian‑born owners to seek financing from any source, but their applications are just as likely to be approved as those of Canadian‑born owners. Both immigrant and Canadian‑born owners reported that, among the seven potential obstacles to growth presented in the survey, access to financing was the least important. The study finds weak evidence to suggest that access to financial capital is a more serious issue among immigrant‑owned SMEs than among SMEs with Canadian‑born owners.